Full Blast – Rio One (2018)


live at at Audio Rebel, Rio, Brazil – 17.7.2016

Released in cooperation with Brasil label QTV
Credits:
Released October 5, 2018

Peter Brötzmann – Reeds
Marino Pliakas – E-Bass
Michael Wertmüller – Drums

Recording engineer: Pedro Azevedo, João Paulo “Binos” Franklin
Pre-mix: João Paulo “Binos” Franklin
Mix and master: Martin Siewert
Artwork: Brötzmann

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The Liberation Project – I can Hear My Papa Calling (2018)

“From the soon to be released album “Songs That Made Us Free”, “I Can Hear My Papa Calling” tells the story of Karim Franceschi, a young Italian activist who fought in the Syrian civil war as a volunteer for the People’s Protection Unit (YPG) against the Islamic State during the Siege of Ayn al-Arab. Karim believed he drew his strength from his father who had fought for the Italian partisans in the mountains of Tuscany. Written by Neill Solomon, Phil Manzanera and Dan Chiorboli.” The Liberation Project

Albert Mangelsdorff Quartet – Never Let It End (Spanish Waltz for La Singla)(1970)

Albert Mangelsdorff – trombone
Heinz Sauer – saxophone (tenor, alto)
Günter Lenz – bass
Ralf Hübner – drums, percussion

Label: MPS Records – MPS 15274
Format: Vinyl, LP; Country: Germany – Released: 1970
Style: Free Jazz
Recorded March 23rd, 1970 Walldorf Studio, Frankfurt, Germany.
Engineer – Torsten Wintermeier
Producer – Joachim Ernst Berendt
Fotos by Inge Werth, cover and graphic work by Günter Kieser

“Mangelsdorff hielt das Never Let It End-Album für eine besonders geglückte Aufnahme seines damaligen Quartetts; er erinnerte dabei besonders an die Solo-Passagen von Heinz Sauer auf dem Altsaxophon und die kollektiv improvisierten Parts. Mangelsdorff zählte Never Let It End zudem zu den herausragenden Alben der europäischen Szene, gerade durch die Verbindung zwischen freier Improvisation und einem gewissen Haften an der Tradition; er bedauerte nur die wenig engagierte Vermarktungsstrategie durch MPS nach der Veröffentlichung des Original-Albums in den 1970er Jahren.” Wiki

Lonnie Holley – I Woke Up…(2018)

““I went to sleep/I went to sleep/Anticipating of dreaming,” Holley opens over delicate piano runs before blown-out drums, quaking synths, and violent, looped trombone disturb the haze. “I dreamed that I woke up/In a fucked up America,” he bellows, his soulful croon turning toward the guttural. In his other career as a sculptor, Holley has long made art from found objects, assembling refuse into immersive sculptures. Here, he pieces together a patchwork of American cruelty: connecting his childhood in Birmingham, Alabama in the Jim Crow-era South to our present moment, he laments the “breakdown of words,” Wall Street crimes, and digital “overdatafying.” But for all his despair, Holley speaks to ways forward, pleading for change and a recognition of dignity. In the dream-logic sermon of “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” Holley makes clear: It’s time we woke up.” Source

The Dreamers & John Zorn – Gormenghast (2015)

Taken from: Pellucidar~A Dreamers Fantabula
Credits:
Cyro Baptista: Percussion
Joey Baron: Drums
Trevor Dunn: Bass
Marc Ribot: Guitar
Jamie Saft: Keyboards
Kenny Wollesen: Vibraphone
John Zorn: Arranger, Composer, Conductor, Producer

“The peculiar thing about Dreamers is that despite the stunning musical acumen of all involved, they aren’t really what one would call a “musician’s band”. Their performances are impressive, but in a subtle way. There are no flights of fancy, just an atmosphere to drape over your senses. When a cozy blanket is covering you, you don’t think about the individual fibers. And when you listen to a Dreamers album, you don’t think about Trevor Dunn’s time in Mr. Bungle. You think about how sweet life is and how having another Dreamers album is now a part of that sweet life.” Source

Masada – Ne’eman (2000)

Live in Sevilla, recorded and released in the year 2000, is arguably the finest document in this extremely prolific jazz quartet’s catalog. If there’s anyone who still believes that John Zorn is nothing more than an avant-garde screamer, look no further. The interplay between Zorn’s alto and the trumpet of Dave Douglas is nothing short of amazing, and each one’s soloing is focused and intense. Joey Baron and Greg Cohen are a fantastic rhythm section; Cohen acts as anchor while Baron playfully dances around the beat, simultaneously supplying a driving pulse. Even when Zorn and Douglas enter the realm of extended techniques (as on the end of “Ne’eman”), Cohen and Baron keep things firmly grounded.”Allmusic

John Zorn – HuDie (胡蝶) (1995)

Hu Die
Guitar – Bill Frisell, Fred Frith
Lyrics By [Text] – Arto Lindsay
Narrator – Zhang Jinglin
Recorded By [1986] – Kramer
Recorded By, Mixed By – Seigen Ono
Translated By – Ruby Chang

“New Traditions in East Asian Bar Bands is an album by American composer and saxophonist/multi-instrumentalist John Zorn consisting of improvised music from paired instruments and narration in Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese. The pieces are listed individually within Zorn’s game pieces and were composed in 1986, 1988 and 1990 respectivel” Wiki