Cecil Taylor – Bemsha Swing (1956)

“Cecil Taylor: Pianist, poet, free jazz pioneer — died 4/5/18 in his home.
A truly distinctive voice on piano, Cecil Taylor was a free jazz composer, performer, and improvisationist whose approach to the instrument often had people likening his style to playing a set of “88 tuned drums.” Starting his solo career in the ’50s, Taylor’s unconventional approach often had him swimming upstream as he waited for music critics and listeners to catch up to the sounds he was making. His career hit a groove in the ’70s, which included a performance in Jimmy Carter’s White House, and Taylor released an impressive number of albums over a career that stretched from 1956 to 2010.” Source

Bernie Worrell – Gladiator Skull (1993)


“”Pieces of WOO: The Other Side” isn’t really a funk album, but rather a jazz/classical/ambient album with heavy funk overtones – an interesting departure for Bernie Worrell, though one that makes complete sense in the progression of his solo albums. A number of instruments and musicians not noted for funk are used for the first time, and the results are downright fascinating. Featuring Amina Claudine Myers, Buckethead, Fred Wesley, Vincent Chancey, Marty Ehrlich, Janet Grice, Patience Higgens, and Umar Bin Hassan.” Bandcamp

Baba Commandant and the Mandingo Band – Bobira (2018)

“Baba Commandant And The Mandingo Band return with their second album, Siri Ba Kele. After the Afro-beat fury of their first album Juguya (2015), the band has now distilled a potent mix of traditional and modern Burkinabe funk with a reverent take on the iconic Mandingue guitar music of the 1970’s. Mamadou Sanou (Baba Commandant) leads the band with a confidence earned from years of toiling in the DIY underground of the West African music scene. His riveting growl and main instrument, the doso n’goni, still strike with a profound delivery. The band’s guitarist, Issouf Diabate, is on board again and his breathtaking guitar work is one of the greatest examples of the instrument displayed in modern times. Massibo Taragna (bass) and Mohamed Sana (drums) are simply one of the finest rhythm sections working today, each a master on his instrument and the chops displayed here are truly something to behold. The band has become an interlocking five-headed hydra of complex funk and cosmic guitar explosions. Recorded in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in February 2018 by Camille Louvel and mixed with SF’s Hisham Mayet, the Mandingo Band’s sophomore LP is a modern statement of searing Sahelian compositions. It stands shoulder-to-shoulder with such classics as Super Biton De Segou (1977), Kanaga De Mopti (1977), Les Ambassadeurs Internationaux (1981) and the mighty Rail Band” Bandcamp

Neneh Cherry – Fallen Leaves (2018)

“In the late ’80s and early ’90s, Neneh Cherry was basically the coolest person on the planet. The daughter of a jazz great, she grew up in Sweden and in London, got into punk rock, and lived with the Slits’ Ari Up. By 1989, she was a pop star, rapping and singing over beats from the UK’s most cutting-edge dance producers. Her first two albums, Raw Like Sushi and Homebrew, are totally essential pieces of pop-music bricolage and attitude projection.
These days, Cherry might still be the coolest person on the planet. Earlier this month, she released “Kong,” a strong new single co-produced by Four Tet and Massive Attack’s 3D. And today, she’s announced plans to release the new album Broken Politics, which, like her 2014 LP Blank Project, was produced entirely by Four Tet.” Source

The Liberation Project – I can Hear My Papa Calling (2018)

“From the soon to be released album “Songs That Made Us Free”, “I Can Hear My Papa Calling” tells the story of Karim Franceschi, a young Italian activist who fought in the Syrian civil war as a volunteer for the People’s Protection Unit (YPG) against the Islamic State during the Siege of Ayn al-Arab. Karim believed he drew his strength from his father who had fought for the Italian partisans in the mountains of Tuscany. Written by Neill Solomon, Phil Manzanera and Dan Chiorboli.” The Liberation Project

Albert Mangelsdorff Quartet – Never Let It End (Spanish Waltz for La Singla)(1970)

Albert Mangelsdorff – trombone
Heinz Sauer – saxophone (tenor, alto)
Günter Lenz – bass
Ralf Hübner – drums, percussion

Label: MPS Records – MPS 15274
Format: Vinyl, LP; Country: Germany – Released: 1970
Style: Free Jazz
Recorded March 23rd, 1970 Walldorf Studio, Frankfurt, Germany.
Engineer – Torsten Wintermeier
Producer – Joachim Ernst Berendt
Fotos by Inge Werth, cover and graphic work by Günter Kieser

“Mangelsdorff hielt das Never Let It End-Album für eine besonders geglückte Aufnahme seines damaligen Quartetts; er erinnerte dabei besonders an die Solo-Passagen von Heinz Sauer auf dem Altsaxophon und die kollektiv improvisierten Parts. Mangelsdorff zählte Never Let It End zudem zu den herausragenden Alben der europäischen Szene, gerade durch die Verbindung zwischen freier Improvisation und einem gewissen Haften an der Tradition; er bedauerte nur die wenig engagierte Vermarktungsstrategie durch MPS nach der Veröffentlichung des Original-Albums in den 1970er Jahren.” Wiki

Lonnie Holley – I Woke Up…(2018)

““I went to sleep/I went to sleep/Anticipating of dreaming,” Holley opens over delicate piano runs before blown-out drums, quaking synths, and violent, looped trombone disturb the haze. “I dreamed that I woke up/In a fucked up America,” he bellows, his soulful croon turning toward the guttural. In his other career as a sculptor, Holley has long made art from found objects, assembling refuse into immersive sculptures. Here, he pieces together a patchwork of American cruelty: connecting his childhood in Birmingham, Alabama in the Jim Crow-era South to our present moment, he laments the “breakdown of words,” Wall Street crimes, and digital “overdatafying.” But for all his despair, Holley speaks to ways forward, pleading for change and a recognition of dignity. In the dream-logic sermon of “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” Holley makes clear: It’s time we woke up.” Source