Detroit City Limits – Cowboys to Girls (1968)

Produced by Mike Terry, featuring the guitar of Eddie Willis

“Born in Grenada, Mississippi, Willis was known for his signature style of muted guitar riffs which added a distinctive tone or “color” to the beat, often timed with the snare, of the hundreds of hit songs recorded at Hitsville U.S.A. for Motown artists. Among the recordings Willis performed on are “Please Mr. Postman” by The Marvelettes, “The Way You Do the Things You Do” by The Temptations, “You Keep Me Hanging On” by The Supremes, and “I Was Made to Love Her” by Stevie Wonder.
Influences for Willis included Chet Atkins, Wes Montgomery, and Albert King. He played a Gibson Firebird guitar on most of his early 1960s work, later moving on to use a Gibson ES-335. On recordings such as The Supremes’ “No Matter What Sign You Are”, Willis performed on a Coral sitar…Willis died on August 20, 2018 in Gore Springs, Mississippi from complications of polio at the age of 82″ Wiki

Advertisements

The California Honeydrops – Call It Home (feat. Bonnie Raitt) (2018)

“This album, like this band and its members, cannot be put in a box. Though very much ‘of this time’, the music and stories on this album take you through many eras, places and points of view. Some songs might find you reminiscing, cruising your old neighborhood a sunny day with a full orchestra pouring out of the stereo. Then suddenly you hear tambourines and voices pouring out of a storefront church. You may find yourself sweating out a weeks work on the dance floor at a house party or just singing round a campfire with a guitar and washboard. You might find yourself taken from a street parade surrounded by mournful horns, to gazing up at the starry sky contemplating your place in the universe, all in a single song. There are many journeys and emotions awaiting the listener on Call it Home. You never know where the Honeydrops will take you, but where ever you end up, you’ll want to dance.”

Manfred Mann – If you gotta go, go now (1965)

“One of the greatest early Manfred Mann sides, this version of the (at the time) unreleased Bob Dylan song gave the band a huge (number two) hit in England in late 1965. The arrangement is one of the greatest adaptations of a Dylan song, rivaling some of the Byrds’ efforts from the period. Led by a fabulous, almost country-rock guitar lick from Mike Vickers and a powerful drum pattern by Mike Hugg, singer Paul Jones lays down one of his greatest vocals, clearly echoing the tough stance of the lyrics. Although the record never made an impact in the U.S., it is widely reported that Dylan himself loved this version and commented that the Manfreds did his material better that most.” Allmusic

Johnny Rawls – Waiting For The Train (2018)

“One of the highlights of the album is the title track, “Waiting for the Train,” a contemplative ballad featuring interesting chord changes and an excellent guitar solo. The train as a transport to heaven is a common theme in gospel music, and this is obviously Rawls’ intent as he sings in the voice of a man contemplating the afterlife, “Get on board and don’t look back . . . I’ve got to be ready, when it comes for me, I’ve got to be ready to be set free.”” Source

The Sea and Cake – Any Day (2018)

Sea

“The Sea and Cake bridge the gap between Brazilian music of the late 1960’s, African influenced guitar lines, and independent pop. A sound that is entirely distinct, centered around the delicate guitar interplay of Sam Prekop and Archer Prewitt, driven by the versatile rhythms of bassist Eric Claridge and drummer John McEntire, and finally set apart by Prekop’s vocals and obtuse lyrics.”