Material – Improvised Music #2 (1981)

Derek Bailey + Fred Frith + Sonny Sharrock + John Zorn + Bill Laswell + Charles K. Noyes

“This is a live recording of a performance by the New York avant-garde group Material. Due to legal complications, the name “Material” was not allowed to be used on this release, as well as there being no song titles. It’s an early performance (Sep. 18, 1981) only for the most open-minded listeners, for the group sticks to aggressive experimental noise which follows no musical conventions at all. Sometimes the group creates some fascinating moments (especially on track 2), but otherwise this is largely enerving, though occasionally amusing (Noyes’ percussion intro on track 7). This features interesting abstract cover art by Thi-Linh Le.” Allmusic

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The Stanley Clarke Band – Alternative Facts (2018)

“The release of Stanley Clarke’s latest album, The Message, comprises magnetic compositions that incorporate various elements of funk, jazz-fusion, and breakbeats. The band’s members—Beka Gochiashvili (pianist), Cameron Graves (keyboardist), and Mike Mitchell (drummer)—come together with featured artists such as Doug E. Fresh, Salar Nadar, Skyeler Kole, Trevor Wesley, and voice actor Steve Blum to cut this eclectic offering of hope, love and compassion (…) The Message is certainly a testament to Clarke’s creativity and longevity as a music artist. From beginning to end, the listener is taken on journey filled with sonic qualities that excite the spirit, satisfy the ear, and calm the soul.” Blackgrooves

Aki Kumar – Dilruba (2018)

“Well, what do we have here. A new CD by Aki Kumar! And what a delight it is! But heck, Aki is ALWAYS a delight. His performances never fail to delight! This CD has blues, but also Aki’s adaptation of Bollywood music and blues. So, it’s not really a total blues record, but i’d think all blues fans and harp players everywhere will have a LOT of fun listening to this as i have. It is at the same time fun and interesting to let Aki take you on his musical adventure of bridging cultures. Consider it a new setting for blues and it’s in a huge party atmostphere provided by Aki and a bunch of excellent top-notch musicians. Many will enjoy Aki’s dissing of Trump in the politcal blues: All Bark No Bite. I believe Aki knows that to remain silent is to be complicit.” Source

Oh Sees – Anthemic Aggressor (2018)

Taken from: Oh Sees – Smote Reverser (Castle Face, 2018)

“The word smote is the past tense of smite: to hit, to strike, to attack. If there’s one thing the latest album from the latest incarnation of John Dwyer’s Oh Sees does, it’s that—smiting and smoting all over the goddamn place. But while there’s always an attack, an aggression, a precision to every second of Smote Reverser, the psych-rock turned every-genre-imaginable outfit explore all kinds of territory over the album’s 11 tracks, as variable takes on ‘70s prog rock and proto-metal morph into Dwyer’s own unpredictable brand of acid-rock-free-jazz-fusion.” Paste

Lambchop – Give Me Your Love (Love Song) (1998)

Curtis Mayfield cover

“… Curtis Mayfield’s “Give Me Your Love (Love Song).” The latter is easily the most jaw-dropping track on What Another Man Spills, with the group easily slipping into the song’s soulful groove without a hint of irony, not even in Wagner’s amazingly Prince-like falsetto …” Source

“What Another Man Spills” Remastered 2018:

Tim Rutili & Craig Ross – Choke (2018)

““Best record I’ve heard in a long time – each song wrapped in it’s own unique foil of odd old colors that get brighter each time you hear – every song worth a good long soak.” – M. Ward

“10 seconds to collapse is brilliant – Tim Rutili and Craig Ross make music of unhinged genius and bruised beauty” – Mark Lanegan

“Melancholy humor, playful messy bombast – it gets the car running then drives it into a ditch to stagger naked into the woods. This is a vast and unpredictable ride. Listen loud .” – Thor Harris (Swans, Shearwater)”
Tim Rutili & Craig Ross – 10 Seconds To Collapse

White Denim – Magazin (2018)

“They blast the record open with the darkly seductive glam of “Magazin”, which rolls like Bolan, punches like Cream and glides like Bowie. The taut but supple rhythm bounces and bobs along, supported by saucy chords and jaunty brass. After a couple of minutes, a head-banging strut appears front and centre, and you’re left waiting for a ripping guitar solo that never appears. Restraint never sounded so good.” Source