Mattiel – Bye Bye (2018)

“I’m not sure at what point ‘Tarantino’ turned from a famed director into a genre of music, but here we are in 2018 with a record that can comfortably be described as peak Tarantino. ‘Mattiel’ is a familiar cocktail of dusty horns, dustbowl blues and Dusty Springfield-style ’60s pop that almost screams out for accompanying widescreen vista or Mexican standoff. There’s even the odd production choice of ending songs while they’re in the process of fading out, as if to cut to the next scene.” Source

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Scott Hirsch – Nothing But Time (2018)


“Songwriter and multi-instrumentalist/producer Scott Hirsch has recorded a follow up to his critically acclaimed 2016 record, Blue Rider Songs. On Lost Time Behind the Moon, Scott chronicles confronting ghosts of the past, acknowledging that darkness rides alongside the light, and avoiding the pitfalls of regret. The record was recorded and produced by Hirsch with the help of Mike Coykendall (M Ward), and features musical guests William Tyler, Mikael Jorgensen (Wilco), Orpheo McCord (Edward Sharpe), Jimmy Calire (America) and Jesse Siebenberg (Lukas Nelson, Supertramp).” Bandcamp

Richard Lloyd – Fire Engine (1987)


“Recorded live on April 21 and 22, 1987 at CBGB’s in New York, this is much more than a live best-of album by the “other” star to emerge from Television. Richard Lloyd has always stood — undeservedly — in the shadow of Tom Verlaine, sort of a Gene Clark to Verlaine’s Roger McGuinn, and for reasons difficult to fathom, his solo career has never taken off. Lloyd’s and David Leonard’s guitar playing is in absolutely top form here, and his voice makes a fine instrument, at least on-stage, whether he’s covering an old Thirteenth Floor Elevators number like “Fire Engine” or his own “Alchemy.” Highlights include the killer ten-minute “Field of Fire” (on which the two guitarists more or less rip the envelope with their extended duet jam); the vocal and lyrical showcase “Pleading” makes for a perfect follow-up number and for a fine presentation of Lloyd’s singing (as well as the crunchy, twisting post-folk-rock guitar that he helped perfect in Television). The sound is excellent throughout.” Allmusic

Dave Davies – Cradle to the Grave (2018)

“The original recordings for ‘Decade’ were unearthed by Davies’ sons Simon and Martin from “under beds, in attics, in storage”, and have been newly mixed and mastered. Some of the musicians who contributed to tracks include longtime Kinks drummer Mick Avory, who appears on ‘If You Are Leaving’ and Dave’s nephew, Phil Palmer, a guitarist who’s worked with Dire Straits, Eric Clapton, Roger Daltrey and many others.” Source

Impala – Prime Directive (2018)

“The all-instrumental combo, formed in the early ’90s, has recently been revived after disbanding in 1997. In The Late Hours is the act’s first new material in more than 20 years and its sixth album overall. Led in part by Scott Bomar of blues/soul revivalists The Bo-Keys, the five piece cranks out what used to be known as bachelor pad music, as long as the bachelor in question is a combination of James Bond, Sam Spade, Inspector Clouseau and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Sleek and sporty as its mid-’60s Chevy namesake automobile, Impala’s ride is smooth and more than able to handle the music’s inherent curves.” Source

Aki Kumar – Dilruba (2018)

“Well, what do we have here. A new CD by Aki Kumar! And what a delight it is! But heck, Aki is ALWAYS a delight. His performances never fail to delight! This CD has blues, but also Aki’s adaptation of Bollywood music and blues. So, it’s not really a total blues record, but i’d think all blues fans and harp players everywhere will have a LOT of fun listening to this as i have. It is at the same time fun and interesting to let Aki take you on his musical adventure of bridging cultures. Consider it a new setting for blues and it’s in a huge party atmostphere provided by Aki and a bunch of excellent top-notch musicians. Many will enjoy Aki’s dissing of Trump in the politcal blues: All Bark No Bite. I believe Aki knows that to remain silent is to be complicit.” Source