Bryan’s Magic Tears – Ghetto Blaster (2018)

“A record that recalls what it is to miss the last train of the day and realize that we are just missing enough to buy a ticket for the next day. A disc evident, indestructible, lunar, romantic, arrogant, phlegmatic and disillusioned. In short, a record for which we would like to be 18 years old again. For how many groups would we be able to say that today?” Born Bad Records

Advertisements

Richard Lloyd – Fire Engine (1987)


“Recorded live on April 21 and 22, 1987 at CBGB’s in New York, this is much more than a live best-of album by the “other” star to emerge from Television. Richard Lloyd has always stood — undeservedly — in the shadow of Tom Verlaine, sort of a Gene Clark to Verlaine’s Roger McGuinn, and for reasons difficult to fathom, his solo career has never taken off. Lloyd’s and David Leonard’s guitar playing is in absolutely top form here, and his voice makes a fine instrument, at least on-stage, whether he’s covering an old Thirteenth Floor Elevators number like “Fire Engine” or his own “Alchemy.” Highlights include the killer ten-minute “Field of Fire” (on which the two guitarists more or less rip the envelope with their extended duet jam); the vocal and lyrical showcase “Pleading” makes for a perfect follow-up number and for a fine presentation of Lloyd’s singing (as well as the crunchy, twisting post-folk-rock guitar that he helped perfect in Television). The sound is excellent throughout.” Allmusic

Mick Harvey & Christopher Richard Barker – Further Down The Line (2018)


“Mick Harvey is best known as a long-time collaborator with Nick Cave and PJ Harvey, but he has also released several solo albums and is a founding member of The Birthday Party, The Bad Seeds, The Boys Next Door, and more. Author Christopher Richard Barker, on the other hand, created the character of Bourchier and his poetry while crafting his novel The Melancholy Haunting of Nicholas Parkes, and then approached Harvey for help with arranging the scores. The result is a powerful and moving fictional narrative that captures the horrors of war on using both micro and macro perspectives.”Source

Spiritflesh – Crib (2018)


“The violence of “Crib” gives way to the stirring tribal patter of “Ever Impending Doom,” where snagging percussion is punctuated with squelchy acid zaps and pealing leads, before melting into the motorik thrum, wild flanging and industrial clank of “Sentient.” It’s the considered dynamics of the mix that gives the music such presence—the cavernous tom blasts in “Sentient” punch out the low end only when it’s absolutely necessary for dramatic impact. The patience with which these sonic accents are deployed creates a constant tension that is central to the experience of the album.” Source

This Kind Of Punishment – Out Of My Hands (1985)

Taken from:
EP: 5 By Four
Label: Flying Nun Records ‎– TKP 003
Format: Vinyl, 12″, EP

“A classic case of obscurity at the time but hosanna in the future, New Zealand’s This Kind of Punishment started as an experiment by brothers Graeme and Peter Jefferies after their earlier group, Nocturnal Projections, fell apart. Their goal was to move away from the punk-ish, more straightforward sound from the early ’80s into a self-consciously more experimental and artistic vein; at which they admirably succeeded over the course of three albums and one EP” Allmusic

Fred Thomas – Ridiculous Landscapes (2018)

“Fred Thomas had been making music nonstop for years when a seismic shift in his creative process happened in 2013. Something mystical opened up in the fall of that year and the prolific songwriter moved from his already emotionally open style into an unprecedentedly direct and vulnerable lyrical approach as well as new levels of detail-fixated production. The songs took on ​a ​new urgency​, inspired by a feeling that life was beginning afresh while at the same time a lifetime of experiences were cementing into worlds of memory.​ ​The results of that creatively eruptive time began with 2015’s critically hailed album All Are Saved, continued into the turbulent pop of 2017’s Changer and now ​float​ into Aftering, a record that feels like the final chapter of an unofficial trilogy.”Bandcamp