Dave Davies – Cradle to the Grave (2018)

“The original recordings for ‘Decade’ were unearthed by Davies’ sons Simon and Martin from “under beds, in attics, in storage”, and have been newly mixed and mastered. Some of the musicians who contributed to tracks include longtime Kinks drummer Mick Avory, who appears on ‘If You Are Leaving’ and Dave’s nephew, Phil Palmer, a guitarist who’s worked with Dire Straits, Eric Clapton, Roger Daltrey and many others.” Source

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Fu Manchu – Regal Begal (1996)

“Fu Manchu was one of the most enduring and influential bands of the ’90s stoner metal movement (along with Kyuss, Monster Magnet, and Sleep), but it wasn’t until their third full-length release, In Search Of…, that the Southern California stoners finally obtained “major” label support by signing with Mammoth Records — not that this had any effect on singer Scott Hill’s indistinctive vocals, or the band’s fuzzy dirge of post-Sabbath riffery with psychedelic overtones. And like most Fu Manchu albums, In Search Of… is a very inconsistent affair, with only a few cuts such as “Asphalt Risin’,” “Strato-Freak,” and “Seahag” really standing out of the pack. Simply put, one gets the impression that Fu Manchu doesn’t try that hard, but then, not every band wants to rule the world. Thankfully, the departure of guitarist Eddie Glass and drummer Ruben Romano to form Nebula soon after this recording would provide the band with the impetus and inspiration to really start moving forward on the following year’s much improved The Action Is Go.” Allmusic

Lou Reed – Coney Island Baby (live 1978)

“Live: Take No Prisoners is a 1978 live album by Lou Reed, recorded during May 1978 at The Bottom Line in New York.
The album contains ad libs by Reed during and between songs, among them a detailed story of the origin of “Walk on the Wild Side,” and a rant against rock music critics, particularly Robert ChristgauTake No Prisoners was recorded during the series of albums where Reed employed the use of a binaural recording setup, using a dummy head with microphones in each ear. The back cover of the album notes: “Produced by Lou Reed for Sister Ray Enterprises LTD. This is a binaural sound recording.”
Bruce Springsteen, who acted as an uncredited vocalist on the studio version of the song “Street Hassle”, was in the crowd during the recording of the live album. During the performance of “Walk on the Wild Side” featured on Take No Prisoners, Reed addresses the musician is in the crowd, saying, “Hi Bruce. Springsteen is alright, by the way. He gets my seal of approval. I think he’s groovy.””
Wiki

White Denim – Magazin (2018)

“They blast the record open with the darkly seductive glam of “Magazin”, which rolls like Bolan, punches like Cream and glides like Bowie. The taut but supple rhythm bounces and bobs along, supported by saucy chords and jaunty brass. After a couple of minutes, a head-banging strut appears front and centre, and you’re left waiting for a ripping guitar solo that never appears. Restraint never sounded so good.” Source

RLYR – Actual Existence (2018)

“Chicago-based experimental rock trio RLYR (pronounced “Relayer”) are proud to present their sophomore album Actual Existence, a four song full-length that distills and expands on the explosive energy and anthemic catharses of the band’s 2016 debut Delayer. Comprising Steven Hess (Locrian, Cleared), Colin DeKuiper (Bloodiest, ex-Russian Circles), and Trevor Shelley de Brauw (Pelican, Chord), RLYR’s indelible earworm melodies belie the intricacy and labryinthian structures of their songs. Actual Existence represents a step forward in complexity for the instrumental band, while preserving the exhilarating climaxes and frenetic intensity that are hallmarks of their live performances.” Bandcamp

Manfred Mann – If you gotta go, go now (1965)

“One of the greatest early Manfred Mann sides, this version of the (at the time) unreleased Bob Dylan song gave the band a huge (number two) hit in England in late 1965. The arrangement is one of the greatest adaptations of a Dylan song, rivaling some of the Byrds’ efforts from the period. Led by a fabulous, almost country-rock guitar lick from Mike Vickers and a powerful drum pattern by Mike Hugg, singer Paul Jones lays down one of his greatest vocals, clearly echoing the tough stance of the lyrics. Although the record never made an impact in the U.S., it is widely reported that Dylan himself loved this version and commented that the Manfreds did his material better that most.” Allmusic